Welcome


This is the homepage of Greg Ashman, a teacher, blogger and PhD candidate living and working in Australia. Everything that I write reflects my own personal opinion and does not necessarily represent the views of my employer or any other organisation.

My podcast lives here

I have a book out for new teachers (which some experienced teachers have also enjoyed):

The Truth about Teaching: An evidence informed guide for new teachers

Watch my researchED talks here and here

I have written a couple of pieces on Australian education for Quillette:

The Tragedy of Australian Education

Australia’s PISA shock

Here is a piece I wrote for The Age, a Melbourne newspaper:

Fads aside, the traditional VCE subjects remain the most valuable

And here I am in the Australian Financial Review:

Ideology crushes teachers’ ability to control classes

Read my articles for the Conversation here:

Ignore the fads

Why students make silly mistakes

I have also written lots of other things, some of which I have forgotten about.

My most popular blog post is about Explicit Teaching:

What is Explicit Instruction?

To commission an article, click here

This is my LinkedIn page and Filling The Pail has a Facebook page here.

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6 thoughts on “Welcome

  1. Ann in L.A. says:

    As to #3, I was planning on writing something about that this morning after an experience yesterday at the 13-year-old’s school. Because of rehearsals for the school play, the majority of his classmates were away from class. So, the school had a student teacher/school employee come in to the class to do an activity. From the sound of it, she was working on a research project and was using the students to collect data…

    …on learning styles.

    She had the kids talk about and think about what learning styles they had and how they best liked to learn.

    When my kid told me this at the end of the day, I wanted to bang my head on the steering wheel. This teacher is going through ed school to get their degree, and is clueless. I was yelling in the car wondering whether she ever bothered to do a basic literature search.

    It shouldn’t be that a parent (actually an aunt) with only an interest in education theory knows more about an utterly debunked theory that than a so-called educator who is enrolled in ed school.

    • Michael Pye says:

      I did my PGCE as an evening class as I work in a college. We never looked at raw research or direct comparisons among competing theories. (We did learn how different ideas like constructionist and behaviorism came about). Until each individual takes the plunge and starts learning how to find (let alone review the evidence) all someone can go on is someone else opinion. To make matters worse most don’t think evidence based practice is anything more then someone eases viewpoint. (Yah anti-science, though the naff quality of most qualitative studies/inappropriate uses of action research reinforce this).

      I am still waiting to meet a teacher who says they like learning styles who can accurately describe the theory (Usually VAK). It is hard to convince someone if their definition of Learning styles is nothing other then mixing up different teaching methods. (Still hardly ideal).

  2. Laura Glisson says:

    Hi Greg,
    Have you ever considered producing a podcast of your blog? I really enjoy reading your blogs and listening to what you have to say – audio versions would be so helpful for my long drives to and from schools in WA.
    Not sure if it’s possible, but I would listen!

    • Chester Draws says:

      Please no. I can’t stand podcasts. They take so much longer to deliver the same information.

      Also, I frequently print out your posts and save them for posterity. I even re-read them while looking at specific topics.

      And I often follow the links the first time round too.

  3. This is quickly becoming one of my top blogs to follow. I am embarking on a journey to evaluate my teaching under the light from properly evidenced research. Little of that was ever shown to me or required as I trained to become a teacher. It is astonishing, but even more so are all the teachers that do not think pedagogy can be studied scientifically. But thanks to you and many others, I feel that I’m on my way to a much better practice. Now I only need to find the time to read all this research.

    Sincerely,
    Henrik, sort-of-new teacher from Sweden

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