Welcome to Filling the Pail by Greg Ashman

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I am Greg Ashman, a teacher, blogger, writer and podcaster. My new blog posts are all at Substack and you can sign-up for free. This site now houses blog archives up to roughly the end of 2020. I’ve written two books – The Truth about Teaching and The Power of Explicit Teaching and Direct Instruction. If you Google my name, you will come across various articles I have written for different sources. My podcast lives here

My most popular blog-posts in this archive are What is Explicit Instruction? and 5 Principles of Education.

If you click on the menu button at the top of this page you can find videos of some of my talks. You can contact me below:

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Mandy Nayton

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-kdrqw-1066613

Mandy Nayton is the Chief Executive Officer of The Dyslexia-SPELD Foundation and President of AUSPELD, the Australian federation of SPELD Associations (SPELD is short for Specific Educational Learning Difficulties). In this episode, Mandy talks to Greg Ashman about her journey from governess on an outback station to where she is today. Along the way, Mandy and Greg discuss the factors that affect children’s engagement with education and the barriers presented by reading failure. They discuss the process of learning to read, vocabulary, morphology and etymology, before chatting about an upcoming researchED conference in Perth and looking to the future for evidence-based education.

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John Sweller

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-3mk8g-102b2c7

John Sweller is Emeritus Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, and is probably best know for his work on Cognitive Load Theory. He is also one of Greg Ashman’s PhD supervisors. In this episode, John talks to Greg about the development of Cognitive Load Theory, its implications and some of the common criticisms levelled at the theory. Along the way, they discuss biologically primary and biologically secondary knowledge as well as their thoughts on the draft new Australian Curriculum.

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Jenny Donovan

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-nmsqp-1017da0

Dr Jenny Donovan is head of the newly formed Australian Education Research Organisation (AERO). Prior to that Jenny has had an influential career in education which has included the founding of the Centre for Education Statistics (CESE) in New South Wales, Australia. In this episode, Jenny talks to Greg Ashman about her journey into education, the work of CESE, including its review of Reading Recovery and its publication of resources on cognitive load theory. Jenny and Greg then discuss AERO and its plans for the future.

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Sonia Cabell

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-rh69d-fd5dc1

Sonia Cabell is an Assistant Professor in the School of Teacher Education and the Florida Center for Reading Research at Florida State University. Sonia started out as a second-grade teacher trained in whole language reading instruction before making the move into research. In this episode, Sonia talks to Greg Ashman about her journey, the effects of the U.S. National Reading Panel report on schools, the ‘science of reading’ and what we mean by that term, academic language development and her recently published paper, co-authored with HyeJin Hwang, on attempts to boost reading comprehension by building children’s knowledge.

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Ollie Lovell

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-t5d5r-fc1a78

Ollie Lovell is a teacher, author, podcaster and entrepreneur. After studying physics and economics, Ollie became a maths teacher in Melbourne where he fed a passion for education research. Recently, Ollie Has written a book on cognitive load theory, Cognitive Load Theory in Action, part of the ‘in action’ series published by John Catt. In this episode, Ollie speaks to Greg Ashman about cognitive load theory, its implications for teachers and some of the controversies surrounding the theory.

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Why Scott Alexander is wrong about schools

This is your periodic reminder that my new blog posts are over at Substack. You can sign-up for a free subscription.

Scott Alexander has been in the newspapers recently – specifically, the New York Times. Alexander (a pseudonym) was the author of Slate Star Codex, a popular blog that I used to dip into and that I have recently learnt was part of a some ‘rationalist movement’ about which I know little. Last year, the New York Times decided to write an article on Alexander and told him that as part of it, they would disclose his real name for lols. Alexander, a practising psychiatrist at the time, concerned about how the publicity may affect his work, complained about this doxing threat and closed down his blog and the New York Times then sat on the story. Now, Alexander has re-emerged on Substack under his real name and the New York Times have finally published their piece which turns out to be something of a hatchet-job, weakly attempting to link Alexander to the alt-right and everything that’s considered bad in their weird universe (you can read Alexander’s rebuttal here).

Continues at Substack

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Academic wellbeing

This is your periodic reminder that my new blog posts are over at substack. You can sign-up for a free subscription.

A recurring motif in the world of the international education consultant is the diagram that opposes one set of ideas against the other – good versus bad.

I was struck by this when I read a new paper for the Australian Centre for Strategic Education by Michael Fullan, a Canadian educational consultant, and hit upon a diagram listing ‘drivers’ for whole system success. The right drivers are called, ‘the human paradigm’ and include, ‘wellbeing and learning’, ‘social intelligence’, ‘equality investments’ and ‘systemness’. How nice! The wrong drivers are apparently, ‘the bloodless paradiagm’ and include ‘academics obsession’, ‘machine intelligence’, ‘austerity’, and ‘fragmentation’. These wrong, rather pale-looking, drivers sound rather bad.

Continues at Substack

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Paul Kirschner

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-g6ath-fa5508

Paul Kirschner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Psychology at the Open University of the Netherlands and Guest Professor at Thomas More University of Applied Science in Belgium. In this episode, Paul talks to Greg Ashman about his long career in educational psychology, the key distinction between epistemology and pedagogy and that Minimal Guidance paper he wrote with John Sweller and Richard Clark. Paul and Greg also discuss Paul’s new book co-authored with Carl Hendrick, How Learning Happens. Unfortunately, Paul and Greg run out of time before all of Greg’s questions are answered and so Paul has agreed to return in the future.

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Filling the Pail has moved to Substack

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From now on, new blog posts will appear on my Substack page. If you navigate to the page, you can sign-up for a free subscription which will alert you to new posts via email. If you follow my WordPress site via email then you will need to sign-up to the new Substack page if you want to keep up-to-date. Until now, I have been cross-posting new Substack posts to WordPress but I am going to stop that. The WordPress site will therefore remain as an archive of posts up to the end of 2020.

There also may be some disruption if you tend to follow my posts via Facebook or LinkedIn because I haven’t yet figured out ways of automating alerts – although I’m looking into it. I will continue to (over)promote posts via Twitter.

Why have I made the switch? I have grown dissatisfied with the (sometimes quite unpleasant) adverts on WordPress and the look of the site. Substack allows for paid subscriptions and then takes a cut of these as its funding source, so they don’t need to put up adverts. This means I can have a free site with no ads. It also means that in the future, if I want to, I can create a paid subscription for additional material for a few dollars a month. I am not sure whether I will do so or what that would look like, but it’s an option missing from WordPress at the moment.

As with all innovations, it may not work out and I may end up back here. Regardless, rest assured that the extensive archive on this page will stay live.

If you like my posts, please consider sharing them on social media and telling friends and colleagues about them. I am about to write a series of posts tackling my key themes. One advantage of Substack is that social media sceptics can receive my posts via email without having to lurk on Twitter.

And finally, if you haven’t checked out my podcast, consider giving that a go too. You’ll find a mix of well-known guests such as Dylan Wiliam alongside guest who should be better known. If you like it, please share and maybe leave a positive review wherever you get your podcasts.

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Natalie Wexler

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-qg2fc-f77f1e

Natalie Wexler is an author and journalist who became interested in educational issues when she began to work with students in disadvantaged schools in Washington. Natalie is co-author of The Writing Revolution, with Judith Hochman and author of The Knowledge Gap. In this episode, Natalie talks to Greg Ashman about her journey into education, the Impact of The Writing Revolution and how its methods align with cognitive science. Natalie and Greg then discuss The Knowledge Gap, the reason why we need more of a knowledge focus in schools and some of the objections and barriers to this idea before discussing some possible solutions.

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